UCLA

ANDREW KOVACS: FIRE STATION

NEWS

FIRE STATION
Major Building Design Studio
Andrew Kovacs, Lecturer, UCLA Architecture and Urban Design

414 is the culminating studio of the core curriculum at UCLA A.UD. From Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown’s Fire Station 
#4 to Zaha Hadid’s Vitra Fire Station, the Fire Station has long been
a public building where architectural issues are expressed and realized
at a modest size. The studio is structured around four central issues
that build over the course of the quarter. These issues have their own mini-reviews throughout the quarter to foster cross studio discussions.
As such, the reviews act as a forum of shared issues to foreground
joint discussions. To ensure discussions remain focused students are selected from each section to represent the discussion of each review.
In addition, these issues are meant to be seen as being continuous and ultimately a capstone of the core curriculum at A.UD. While these issues have a defined place throughout the quarter they should be seen as a progression throughout the quarter.

1) PRECEDENT / ANALYSIS / TYPOLOGY

The fire station has a very defined set of constraints while having
a unique mix of program. It must accommodate everything from revolving living paces to the storage and maintenance of large equipment.

2) PLAN / ORGANIZATION

The fire station has a very clear organization that is best expressed in the plan dimension. The most banal set of activities, the storage and maintenance of equipment along with their adjacencies and separation are all important considerations. Small innovations, for example the use of Murphy Beds in the residential quarters can have consequences in the overall layout.

3) MASSING / ICONOGRAPHY

The fire station is a small architectural icon in the community. As such, the fire station is a public building. Yet, to the everyday citizen its image might be more accessible than its interior.

4) PRESENTATION / REPRESENTATION / ARGUMENT

The fire station is an iconic shed. It is an ordinary yet highly functional building that has a visual presence in the community. As such, the verbal and visual arguments are as important as the design considerations of each project. The Fire Station has a conceptual division of 50/50 - there is the apparatus bay dedicated to the storage and maintenance of equipment and then there is the remaining half dedicated to activities of everyday life. As such, the fire station is typologically determined. Through the creation and implementation of a typological primer this studio will focus on the minute aspects of the fire stations organization and we will push for a perverse functionalism. In addition, we will focus on the fire station as a social palace - one that has an iconic presence in the community that is the result of a conglomeration of various functional elements. 



Students: Moigan Aghamir, Jon Bruni, Aaron Gutierrez, Liuxi He, Ryan Hernandez, Yao Huang, Dokyung Kim, Andrew Ko, Jennette Mundy, Haoyuan Tan, Tuan Tran, Taoran Zhao, Can Zhou

 

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